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Letter: Frightening

To the Lakewood Community,

I was driving down a quiet residential street one evening when I saw what looked like a remote control car coming towards me.

It was hard to tell what exactly it was, but it had one bright light close to the ground so it was clearly not a car or a motorcycle. I moved out of its path to avoid running over it.

As I passed it, I saw it was a Bachur in a black coat, wearing his black hat, riding some sort of Segway or hoverboard. He was likely coming home from maariv, completely unaware that he was indistinguishable to drivers from the general darkness of a moonless night on a dim street. I could easily have hit him.

Please, please wear reflectors and do not allow your sons to be near cars at night without one!

A concerned mother.

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There are 7 Comments to "Letter: Frightening"

  • Anonymous says:

    To add to this letter, I was turning a corner last night and only after I turned did I see several bachurim in black coats by the shoulder trying to hitch. Please, if your sons are going to hitch at night, please tell them to wear reflectors

  • stirring the pot says:

    i was driving down the road and i saw 2 lights coming toward me turns out it was a car driving in the opposite direction i couldve hit it if i went into the other lane – you saw him and he saw you whats the issue why does it matter that you thought it was a remote control car and it turned out to be a bachur on a segway you moved out of the way because you saw the light that what its there for and it serves the same purpose as a reflector no need to know if its a cow or a person coming at you

    • Midnight says:

      Congrats! you win the moron award!!!

      your next assignment would be to consider what the possibility is that a driver doesnt move out of the way of the “remote control car”? say, ibn a scenario where there are garbage cans preventing one from moving over, or a car parked along or whatnot.
      GOOG LUCK!!!

  • I'm like, Hello ??!! says:

    This article is 100% right..
    And I’m shocked, SHOCKED, that in 20212 we still need articles about the importance of pedestrians to wear reflectors. Our poskim paskened years ago, in light of several tragic pedestrian accidents, that wearing reflectors are allowed on Shabbos.
    Please, PLEASE, everyone, wear reflectors at night.

  • NEW IDEA says:

    They MUST start manufacturing boys and men’s coats with reflectors sewed onto it — inconspicuously but that shine with light. If someone would do this, it would be a big zchus.. Until then, maybe mothers could find a way to permanently attach a small piece of reflector in the front and back. I

  • Rose says:

    To midnight and stirring the pot:
    No need to be a leitz. This is a matter of common sense.
    I don’t know where you come from but in civilized society boys DO NOT belong zooming in the street near cars. The road is for vehicular traffic. What the boys are doing nowadays on these segways etc is downright dangerous and fool hardy. I don’t know how any sane person can think otherwise.

  • Uncommon sense says:

    Yes! And don’t limit it to bochurim. I was driving to the hospital one night last week, and missed a man on Spruce St by less than 5 feet. (He stepped out from between the cars, which is dangerous even in daylight).

    I got onto River, and a boy was riding his bike diagonally across the road. It’s nice to be right outside a hospital for an emergency, but people should try a little harder to stay out of it.

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